2015 Jekyll 27.5 4

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OVERDO IT.

The most successful Enduro platform in the world evolves into an all-new race weapon with the 2015 Jekyll. Working with Enduro World Champion Jerome Clementz, we made his winning bike even winning-er with all-new geometry, SuperMax front suspension, a new Fox DYAD rear shock tune with increased travel, and of course, 27.5” wheels.

You don’t have to be Jerome to appreciate its perfect-for -Enduro dual nature - you just have to want the most versatile all-mountain bike out there.

Jekyll is:

  • An adept climber and aggressive descender.
  • True two-bikes-in one performance that no other all-mountain bike can match.
  • The perfect enduro machine.
  • Rider profile:

    Enduro racers, or all-mountain shredders who want to climb fast, but want to descend even faster across the whole range of mountain terrain.

    TRAVEL

    90mm to 150mm on-the-fly adjustable rear travel. (*some models have 150mm travel X-Fusion P1RL pull shock with platform lockout.)

    DYAD RT2

    The same two-shocks-in-one DYAD technology found on the other OverMountain bikes, but with shock stroke, air spring volumes and damping created specifically for the Jekyll.

    ATTITUDE ADJUST

    Switch between modes on the DYAD and the bike’s geometry changes too. Steeper and more nimble in Elevate mode, lower and more stable in Flow mode.

    BALLISTEC CARBON / SMARTFORMED ALLOY

    Using fibers developed by the military for ballistic armoring, this high-strength carbon construction process yields a frame that’s lighter than aluminum and pound-for-pound stronger than steel. The alloy versions use our ultra sophisticated SmartFormed aluminum construction for a frame that’s light and strong.

    ECS-TC SYSTEM

    Clamped, 15mm thru-axles in the shock linkage and swingarm pivot, as well as double bearings at the rear dropouts eliminate flex and provide unmatched center-stiffness for complete control.
    Frame

    JEKYLL 27.5(650B), 160/95MM, SMARTFORMED ALLOY, BB30, ISCG03, 1.5 SI HEADTUBE

    Fork

    ROCKSHOX PIKE RC 27.5, 160MM, SOLO AIR, 15MM MAXLE, TAPERED STEERER

    Crank

    SHIMANO DEORE HOLLOWTECH II 40/30/22

    Bottom Bracket

    SHIMANO DEORE W/ WHEELS MFG ADAPTER

    Shifters

    SHIMANO SLX W/ I-SPEC

    Cog Set

    SUNRACE 11-36 10-SPEED

    Chain

    KMC X10 10-SPEED

    Front Derailleur

    SHIMANO SLX DIRECT MOUNT

    Rear Derailleur

    SHIMANO SLX SHADOW PLUS

    Rims

    WTB ST I23 TCS TUBELESS READY 27.5INCH

    Hubs

    FORMULA DC-51 15MM THRU AXLE FRONT DHG 142X12MM REAR

    Tires

    SCHWALBE HANS DAMPF PERFORMANCE 650X2.35INCH FRONT NOBBY NIC 650X2.25INCH REAR TUBELESS READY

    Pedals

    N/A

    Brake

    SHIMANO SLX 180/180MM

    Handlebar

    CANNONDALE C3 RISER 6061 DOUBLE-BUTTED ALLOY 740X18MM

    Stem

    CANNONDALE C1 1-1/8INCH 31.8 5 DEG.

    Headset

    TANGE SEIKI 1-1/8 TO 1.5INCH INTEGRATED

    Grips

    CANNONDALE DUAL LOCKING GRIPS

    Saddle

    WTB SILVERADO COMP

    Seat Post

    CANNONDALE C3 6061 ALLOY 31.6X350MM (S M) 400MM (L X)

    Rear Shock

    FOX DYAD RT2 160/95MM ADJ. TRAVEL 2015 TUNE

    Extras

    HIGH PRESSURE SHOCK PUMP

    REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

    by PowerReviews
    cannondale2015 Jekyll 27.5 4
     
    5.0

    (based on 1 review)

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    (1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    Cannondale Jekyll

    By Mark

    from PA

    About Me Avid Cyclist

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

      Cons

        Best Uses

          Comments about cannondale 2015 Jekyll 27.5 4:

          Cannondale markets the 2013 Jekyll MX as the perfect mountain bike for enduro racing and technical all mountain riding, and on paper it certainly looks the part. Having spent the summer riding the MX up, down, and around nearly every trail in Central Pennsylvania, I can report that the MX lives up to the hype and might very well be a one stop shop for all your enduro riding needs.

          The Basic Specs
          Price Paid

          $4,000

          Purchased At

          The Bicycle Shop, State College, PA

          Frame

          Holding everything together on the MX is a massive aluminum frame. For another $2,500 or so, you can move up to a carbon fiber frame. The head tube accepts a 1.5" integrated headset, and the head tube angle is 67.9 degrees. For more on the frame geometry you can visit the Cannondale site.

          Rear Shock

          The MX is fitted with proprietary rear shock designed and built in conjunction with Fox. It is a pull shock and provides 150 or 90 mm of travel. A remote thumb lever on the handlebar activates the two shock modes.

          Front Suspension

          Up front, the MX sports a Fox 36 Float R Performance shock with a 20QR and 160mm of travel.

          Components

          With the exception of Sram front derailleur and crankset, Shimano XT components make the bike go. A RockShox Reverb seat post provides the perch and the cockpit is outfitted with a 740mm handlebar on a 31.8 stem. The bike comes with tubes but is tubeless ready.

          The Down and Dirty

          In true enduro form, the MX was designed to be pedaled to the top and then rip its way down. Making much of that possible is the Fox Dyad Shock. This somewhat big and odd-looking pull shock is actually two shocks in one. In long travel mode, you get 150mm of travel. Short travel mode provides 90mm. Setting up this shock requires filling two different air reservoirs and may seem a bit intimidating at first, but it is really quite simple. I weigh about 185 pounds with gear. I use the following procedure to set up the shock.

          Release the negative pressure.
          Set the positive pressure to 300 lbs.
          Set the negative pressure to 250 lbs.
          Aside from setting the rebound, 7 clicks out on both for me, that's it.

          I must say that the proprietary and complex nature of the Dyad shock gave me pause at first. In fact, prior to riding and then researching the shock, it was a deal breaker. That obviously changed,

          So how does the shock perform? In short-travel mode the shock allows me to climb faster with little to no noticeable pedal bob. This is the first longer-travel bike that I have been able to comfortably stand and pedal, still not the best way to climb on this bike, but when standing, you don't feel like you are pedaling in mud. Prior to purchasing the Cannondale, I rode the Yeti SB66 and the Specialized Enduro. The Jekyll was by far the faster climber. Some people have written that the short-travel mode of the Dyad shock is a gimmick. I can only disagree and suggest you ride one prior to forming an opinion.

          When things get technical, the MX's long travel mode feels different from most other longer-travel bikes I have ridden. If you are looking for endless plushness, you are not going to get it here. You are provided with a planted and stable platform that allows you to attack the terrain without a wallowing feel. The stiffness of the frame, and it is extremely stiff, combined with the uniqueness of the shock, rewards the aggressive rider. The MX wants to and needs to be ridden fast.

          The Fox 36, 160mm Float R Performance fork is well matched to the rear shock. You don't get a lot of bells and whistles with this fork. You can adjust the air pressure and rebound. There is no compression adjustment (other than air pressure). The lack of adjustment can be a no go for many of you, but for me the fork works as is. Set the pressure at 60 pounds with the rebound a few clicks out, and I am good to go. The fork is stiff, tracks well, and like the rear shock, wants to be ridden fast. I am sure upgrading the fork would give better performance, but I doubt it would allow me to go much faster downhill.

          Out of the box, all of the components work well with one exception. The front brake had a tendency to overheat and fade. By replacing the 180mm brake rotor with a 210mm brake rotor, the problem was solved. Depending on your weight and riding style, you may or may not need to make this change.

          I am 5'11" and went with a large frame. The large frame allows me to feel more a part of the bike. With 740mm wide bars and a short stem, the cockpit of the bike puts you in an aggressive position for descending but a comfortable riding position for climbing.

          The MX rolls on WTB tires, a Vigilante on the front and Moto in the rear. The Moto worked well, but I changed it out for the slightly wider Vigilante. The Vigilantes corner extremely well and I am now on my third set. Yes, one negative of the Vigilante is that it is not the longest lasting tire. If you can put up with the relatively short life span of the Vigilante, you are rewarded with a sticky tire that works well in all conditions. It is by far my favorite tire. I run tubes in them, but they are tubeless ready.

          To Creak or Not To Creak

          Every full suspension bike I have had has creaked at one time or another. So far the Cannondale is the quietest, but the development of a recent headset creak is a reminder that full suspension bikes require a bit more maintenance when compared to your hardtail.

          Final Verdict
          For $4,000, the MX is a race-ready enduro bike. The uniqueness of the rear shock, and the bike's overall ride characteristics may not appeal to everyone, and I would certainly recommend riding the bike before buying the bike, but the bike works well in all conditions and has allowed me to become a more aggressive and confident rider. For now, this is the best bike I have ridden. If you are looking for an aggressive trail bike, this may be it.

          Your Reviewer

          Mark has been mountain biking for over 35 years. He has worked in bicycle shops, and he has competed in all aspects of mountain biking, and he has yet to win anything. He currently lives in State College, PA where he spends time riding the trails of Tussey Mountain, Cooper's Gap, and anywhere that is fun to ride.

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